About Us

About Natalie Perry

NATALIE PERRY creates everyday luxury jewellery inspired by the beauty of imperfection. Her collections evoke bohemian elegance with delicate detailing that makes you want to look closer. Each piece is made in her London studio using recycled gold and silver, Fairtrade Gold and responsibly sourced gemstones.

Natalie graduated from Middlesex University with a Batchelor’s degree in Jewellery & Accessories, where she developed her signature style, drawing inspiration from her love of textiles, ancient jewellery and the natural world around her. 

It was her time spent in India, working as a designer for one of Jaipur’s leading diamond jewellery houses, that cemented her passion for gold and gemstones and the idea for her brand was born. On her return to London, Natalie assisted British jewellery designer, Alice Cicolini, and spent some years working in jewellery PR, before launching her label at London Fashion Week in 2017 - winning Professional Jeweller’s Ethical Collection of the Year that same year.

Natalie Perry aspires to create timeless jewels with a sophisticated sensibility for today’s modern woman. Her collections are built on a keen eye for exquisite intricacy and gentle juxtaposition, creating miniature treasures with hidden details that are for the wearer alone. 

Since the brand's launch Natalie Perry's collections have captured the attention of leading journalists and have been featured in titles including Marie Claire, The Times, Red & Stylist; as well as Preeta Agarwal's 'India Inspired' luxury jewellery book.

Awards

  • Named Young Designer of the Year 2018 at the Professional Jeweller Awards
  • Shortlisted as New Designer of the Year 2018 in the UK Jewellery Awards
  • Named as one of Retail Jeweller's 30 Under 30 Rising Stars recognised for ethical jewellery design
  • Winner of Ethical Collection of the Year 2017 in Professional Jeweller's Collections of the Year
Natalie Perry
“A magnificent flower slowly wilting and occasionally dropping a petal, its brilliance fading, its stalk bending ever lower.”
Comment on the Mughal Empire. Stuart Cary Welch. India: Art & Culture 1300-1900. 1985.